How to make it more attractive to the industry to "communicate the benefits of sustainable tourism to consumers"? - Network - Tourist

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How to make it more attractive to the industry to "communicate the benefits of sustainable tourism to consumers"?

People who are engaged in sustainability, may it be in consuming in general, in transport or classical tourism, are suffering, most of them, from a sickness called naivity. They tend to believe that "if only..." those and these powerful people or specific target groups "would do..." this and that, and "everything would become fine.

That's - I am terribly sorry - nonsense. Everybody who invests a bit of his time into reflection how one hibehaves, what motives are behind someones behaviour, what role power, desire and all other factors of motivation plays, then it becomes pretty absurd to believe something like the following idea:

The industry, after having invested a big mount of money into the development of products which are easy to sell in order to make a lot of money, should now decide:
"Oh, how bad we are! We shouldn't sell that! We should convince the consumer (whoever this may by) to buy products which are much more expensive, packed without any shiny and pretty plastic, and which operate for a very long time instead of getting damaged due to obsolescence... So also in times when fashions are already changed and the consumer is looking for new products helping him to gain symbolic capital...

As far as I have seen, critical people tend to become priests or monks instead of entrepreneurs who develop products to make money...

To come to the point: Hoping is not very helpful. The industry follows systemic conditions. Well adapted entrepreneurs will survive, which means: They "sustain" on the "environment" of their market, and it is their consumers which are a crucial part of their (social) environment.
So what we need is a change of framework: New laws, new regulations of the market.
The idea of the "free market who regulates everything" is dead. It has been de-masked as bullshit because the free market only swaps out internal costs to others, especially environmental costs. It is the future generation who pays for them, and those parts of the world population who haven't taken profit at all from this business.

But that's the way it is. So the big question is: How to kick governments in their.... in order to make them sustainability-compatible regulations?

My suggestion is: By social pressure, by civil disobedience, by many many Greta Thunbergs who are forcing governments to create sustainability-compatible regulations, to force the industry to create and market sustainability-compatible products - and finally to force the mass of consumers to start to think if they need all that trash that is offered to them promising some instants of bought happyness...

Networks like this, that's my conclusion, are no adquate instrument to mobilize people...

Ceterum censeo mutationem climae esse vincendem.

(Incidentally, I think that global warming must be defeated) 

 

Prof. (FH) Mag. Mag. Dr. Harald A. Friedl
Assoc. Professor for Sustainability and Ethics in Tourism
Institute for  Health and Tourism Management
FH JOANNEUM - University of Applied Sciences
Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Straße 24
8344 Bad Gleichenberg, Austria
Phone office +43-316/5453-6725
Phone mobil: +43-699/191.44.250
eMail: harald.friedl@fh-joanneum.at
Web: www.fh-joanneum.at/GMT

 

How to make it more attractive to the industry to "not communicate the non benefits of sustainable tourism to consumers"?

https://www.chiangmaicitylife.com/citynews/local/mae-khampong-restaurant-gets-into-hot-water-for-refusing-chinese-and-foreign-guests/

 

I am not sure if I understand your message? Especially in this context? Could you please give some comments.

What I read is that both customers and business people are afraid of - whatever; in this case: Corona virus, to get infected by Chinese people... a very old phenomenon of human irrational reaction, but to be honest: Where do WE academics know from for sure how dangerous a virus might be and how high or low the chance of the emerge of a pandemie might be...
Where should simple business people know from, them?

...whichs brings it all back to your main conclusion: It is all about managing the communication processes of a crisis...

Thanks, Harry

Ceterum censeo mutationem climae esse vincendem.

(Incidentally, I think that global warming must be defeated) 

 

Prof. (FH) Mag. Mag. Dr. Harald A. Friedl
Assoc. Professor for Sustainability and Ethics in Tourism
Institute for  Health and Tourism Management
FH JOANNEUM - University of Applied Sciences
Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Straße 24
8344 Bad Gleichenberg, Austria
Phone office +43-316/5453-6725
Phone mobil: +43-699/191.44.250
eMail: harald.friedl@fh-joanneum.at
Web: www.fh-joanneum.at/GMT